Fire Safety Is Essential

It’s important to have a smoke detector in your home because
  • 67% of all fires occur at home
  • 74% of fire related deaths occur at home
  • Pets need to be protected from fire incidents when you’re not home
There are two types of smoke detectors: one uses photoelectric and the other uses ionization smoke detection technology. Fire departments recommend using both photoelectric and ionization smoke detectors.
What is the difference?
Photoelectric Smoke Detectors

  • Are monitored by Price’s Alarms
  • Detect smouldering fires earlier, often alerting authorities before a full-blown blaze breaks out
  • Have earlier detection of smouldering fires is important because homes are filled with fire resistance materials, meaning that fires often smoulder before they ignite
  • Have the ability to “see” smoke,
  • Has a battery backup
  • Is hard-wired in to your home’s electrical system
  • Sends a fire alarm signal immediately if it’s a modern system, or if it’s an older system, may or may not have a 30 second delay before sending a signal
Ionization Smoke Detectors

  • Are standard house smoke detectors, often purchased from hardware stores
  • Are battery operated or wired into the house air conditioning
  • Utilize an older technology which doesn’t detect smouldering fires as quickly as photoelectric smoke detectors
  • Are faster at detecting open flames or electrical fires (where fire is smelled but smoke isn’t seen)
  • Have a failure rate of 20%
Smoke Detectors Vs. Heat/Rate-Of-Rise Detectors
Smoke

  • Detects smoke (airborne particles)
Heat

  • Trips when a certain temperature is reached, such as 135 F or 190 F
  • Must be replaced after alarm signal temperature is reached
Rate-Of-Rise

  • Detects rapid increases in temperature (such as 15 degrees/minute)
  • Comes with a built-in heat detector (135 F or 190F)
Locations Where A Heat/Rate-Of-Rise Detector Should Be Used Instead Of A Smoke Detector

  • In the kitchen
  • By the bathroom (steam can mimic smoke and cause false alarms)
  • In a dusty environment such as a workshop or attic
  • In an outdoor environment, such as a garage or barn
  • In the corner of a room or by a wall